God is not fixing this?

“God is not fixing this.” That was the headline recently seen on a newspaper in New York. The startling statement was written in response to a mass shooting in California and certain politicians reacting by offering prayers. I would like to take just a moment to speak to this idea that God is not doing anything about our worldly problems and how we as Christians can do more to influence our culture.

To begin, the headline would lead us to believe that God is unable to make an impact in the world and that, instead, humans should figure out our problems without turning to God. While this sounds like a laudable idea, there are a few items that should be raised.

  1. Is it not possible that the reason we are in this mix to begin with is that we willfully cast off God and His guidance years ago when we began to remove His influence from the public sphere? Accordingly, we have shoved God to the side, ran into a problem, and then blamed Him for not fixing it.
  2. Is it not possible that God does have a fix for our social problems, but we simply do not wish to hear His solution? After all, God’s solution may cramp our style somewhat and cause us to say that some behaviors are wrong, take responsibility for our own actions instead of blaming others, and perhaps change some of our activities.
  3. Is it not possible that God has chosen not to hear our prayers because we have chosen not to listen to Him?

Still, let’s work with the idea that we can solve all of our problems in an entirely humanistic manner, totally devoid of God. Are there good examples of such a program working to solve the problems facing humanity? Communism has not exactly been a blessing to the human race. At least, it sure hasn’t been very beneficial to the folks who endured living in the Soviet Union, or those who still reside in North Korea or those parts of China not in special economic areas where capitalism is allowed. Eugenics is also something that I would say the human race is not proud of. And, if what I understand is correct, abortion has accounted for the deaths of more than 50 million unborn babies in the United States alone. What else have we come up with that is totally devoid of God?

Some will say that science is our contribution to fixing the woes of humanity. But is this so? Weren’t most of the founders of science theists of some sort? In fact, many of them were devout Christians. But, maybe you reject that idea and declare that despite these early examples of believer scientists, the field of science is totally devoid of God. While you may say to yourself that scientific work can be carried out without recourse to God, you might want to look over your shoulder and consider where those ethics come from. Ask yourself, why is it that we don’t tend to experiment on human beings (of course human experimentation does take place, but this is typically only after extensive testing on other mediums).

Science does not give us ethics. Again, ask yourself, what ethic can we completely derive from science? Can we deduce that it is wrong to hurt others, or is this something we import from outside the field of science? A person may not want to acknowledge where these ethics come from, but when the dust settles I think it will become obvious that the ethics we use have their basis a theistic worldview.

So, if entirely humanistic methods for solving our world’s problems are insufficient for the task at hand, perhaps it would be best if we turned back to the creator, sought His guidance, and then acted accordingly. Notice that we do not simply seek guidance, through prayer and the diligent study of the Bible, but we must then transition into action. God created the world, provided the redeemer for fallen humankind, and has left us His revealed will in Scripture. In a sense, the headline has a great deal of merit: we should not sit back and stare at the sky, but should instead be busy carrying out the work that he has already laid out for us.

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