Category Archives: Culture

Happy Reformation Day!

In honor of this 500th Anniversary of Reformation Day, I am posting some photos relevant to the occassion.  Enjoy!

The Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany.  Of the original, only the four walls remain.  The church has been destroyed multiple times since Reformation.

Sculptures of Luther and Melanchthon inside the Castle Church.  Also in this picture are the graves of the two men. Yes, there are a lot of people buried inside some of those old churches.

Pictures inside the church in Wittenberg that Luther actually preferred to attend.  He spoke at the Castle Church as part of his employment contract.  The Castle Church was, in fact, a private church.

The church in Erfurt, Germany, where Luther was ordained.

An original Luther Bible.  I only wish the picture was a little clearer and did a better job of showing the size of this volume – it is massive.

An original indulgence and various coins that would have been used at the time frame to pay for indulgneces.

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And, finally, what you have been waiting for… “the door.”  Unfortunately, it is something of a letdown since it is not original.  The actual door was destroyed quite some time ago.  This is the site of that famous door, and the one you see here memorializes the event by including the 95 theses in its design.

Have a blessed day!

A Denomination’s Descent Into Irrelevance

I have been a staunch defender of my denomination (The United Methodist Church) throughout my life as a Christian.  However, that being said, I have also been a witness to that very same denomination’s continuous descent into irrelevance.  I get daily emails from our News Service detailing all the trendy projects that we have gotten involved with or how we have joined in with issues that are celebrity causes.

I am saddened by what has happened, but I cannot say that I am surprised.  What, you might ask, has led this descent into irrelevance?  In my humble estimation there is no clearer answer than that the church has become obsessed with being culturally relevant.

What do I mean by this?  To me, it’s simple.  The church has chosen to alter or set aside it doctrines and discipline in an effort to be more acceptable to the mainstream culture.  While this sounds all well and good there are some serious difficulties that accompany such a strategy.

  1. The church was never supposed to conform to the culture.  From its inception, the church was countercultural.  The membership of the body of Christ is to “seek ye first the kingdom of God,” (Matt. 6:33 KJV) not to seek approval of the prevailing culture.  The church is to be in pursuit of holiness.
  2. By pulling up its theological anchor and allowing itself to be blown about by the winds of worldly culture, the denomination has diminished its identity and become just another unstable institution in an unstable world.  There is a longing out there for something that is consistent, steady, and willing to stand against the currents of our world.  The church has always been a rock that people could stand on during turbulent times.  But when the church seeks to appease the world by forsaking its doctrinal integrity, what you are left with is something built on shifting sands.
  3. Cultural appeasement is a slippery slope.  If we acquiesce to the whims of worldly culture at points A, B, and C, is there a point at which the process can, and will, stop?  Looking at other examples from mainstream Protestantism the answer appears to be, no.

This is something of a gripe session and it is late in the evening here, but it hurts me to see the way we have become obsessed with chasing after all the latest trendy projects while never looking back to make certain that we have not lost our way.

In the pursuit of relevance, we are becoming increasingly irrelevant.  Let us return to our roots and consider our theological foundations that we may be better equipped to engage a hurting world.  After all, if we lose our identity by tossing to the side our doctrine and discipline, then we are just another social group.  And that is not what we have been called to be.

When all else fails, call’em names!

Before going too far, I should note that my blogging production will decrease in the future.  If you are one of the ten-or-so people that read this blog, then you will have noticed already that the once a week pattern has recently been abandoned.  For, you see, when I started this blog I was on vacation from work, and that is a period of time ripe for the Good Idea Fairy to strike.    Since then, things like work, family, and my interests in other stuff have made this blog a rather low priority in my life.  Still, I thought I would jot down a few words about a sad trend in person-to-person communication.

It seems that many of us have lost the ability to dialog.  Whether in politics, religion, entertainment, or just about anything else, there is no willingness to show respect for those we disagree with.  A conversation, especially on the internet, between two people who disagree on something can easily go like this:

Person A: “I like pork and beans.”

Person B: “Well, that’s because you’re an idiot.  Pork and beans are only for slobs and lazy people without an education.  Is that what you are?  A lazy, uneducated slob?”

Fortunately, in recent months, I have found a weekly radio program out of the UK called Unbelievable? to be a breath of fresh air.  It is a radio program that aims to bring together a Christian and non-Christian each week (there are exceptions) to discuss points of difference.  There is a moderator, which is certainly necessary, but the guests as a whole are respectful of one another.  Sadly, the exceptions to the civil discussions on this show almost exclusively come from people from the States, which is disappointing to say the least.  But, I digress.

The point of this rambling post is just to say that we, as a people, should strive to be better at addressing arguments instead of attacking people.  The ad hominem fallacy is so widespread today that it is seen as acceptable in many quarters.  This is a shame, and it will ultimately lead to a dumbing down of our society by silencing voices.

Beauty and Identity

I have been intrigued with how we as a people have become more and more expressive through the use of accessories.  We color our hair, we tattoo our skin, we pierce our bodies in various and sundry places, and so forth.  While there is nothing necessarily wrong with these things, I am surprised by how often people identify more with the accessory than what is underneath it.

What intrigues me is that people will often add things to themselves and then say, “This is who I am.”  Now, it may be true that some sort of accessory may express what is happening inside.  However, I like to think that the person is the person.  If you pierce your eyelid, then it is you with a pierced eyelid.  If you color your hair purple, it is you with purple hair – an alteration of your actual hair color.

I suppose that I should also say that I have no objection to a person accessorizing (sp?) as they see fit.  I do, however, find it troubling that we can start to associate beauty more with the accessory than with the actual person.  So, a woman may feel that she needs to pierce herself or modify her body in some other way not because of any desire that comes naturally from within her, but from outside pressures that tell her she must do x and y in order to be beautiful.  As a father, this breaks my heart.

From where I sit, on my couch on a Saturday afternoon, I like to think that beauty comes from the Creator.  As humans, we all bear the image of God and have intrinsic beauty.  It is good and healthy for us to maintain our health, but there should be no need for us to feel compelled to transform ourselves into the mold that that someone else has made for us.

Have a great weekend!

God is not a court jester

Have you ever heard or read someone lamenting that there is simply not enough evidence to suggest that God exists? Or, that if He does exist, then He should make it obvious? I have, and I have always wondered what kind of evidence exactly these folks are looking for.

What evidence would be enough to demonstrate to another person that God exists? For some, the thought is that we should expect to see God write “I am real!” in the clouds. However, I am convinced that even this would not convince most unbelievers. To be quite plain, the evidence for God is all around us in creation. Sure, there are materialistic ways to explain most of what we see, but I do not see how this explains away God. After all, you could stumble into my kitchen on a Saturday morning, find a pot of cheese grits on the stove, explain there existence through various laws of physics, and defiantly claim that no grit-maker exists because everything could be explained materialistically. The problem with this, however, is that I do exist.

So, lets consider the evidence that God could provide us, and how He has fared in providing it:

  • He could write something to us. Check – Bible.
  • He could speak to us in some way. Check – prophets.
  • He could physically come into the world and dwell with us. Check – Jesus.
  • He could make the created order look like something designed by an intelligent creator. Check – the created order certainly appears to have design.
  • He could make us naturally inclined to believe in Him. Check – we do have natural biases towards seeing design in nature and desiring the supernatural.

This is a small list off the top of my head illustrating that God has given us plenty of evidence for His existence. But, as you may be aware, those who do not believe will typically scoff at the items on this list. So, the real issue is not that God has failed to give us evidence. Indeed, it appears that the real issue is that God is not capable of being manipulated. People want God to be a court jester and not the sovereign ruler and creator of all that is.

A court jester can be told what to do, when to do it, and how it should be done. If God were a court jester, we could demand services from Him and expect them to be done in the way we want at the time we want. And, at the end of the day, it seems that this is what skeptical people are after. But, if God were a court jester, he would not be worth worshiping. The one true God, however, is worthy of our worship and He is not a court jester but is indeed the King of kings and Lord of lords.

Sell everything you own?

From time to time, the objection will come up that Christians are hypocrites, and unwilling to follow Jesus’ commands. A common line of reasoning behind this view is that Christians do not sell everything they own and give it to the poor. The statement in question is found in Matthew 19:21 and reads:

Jesus said to him, “If you would be perfect, go, sell what you possess and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.”

Now, the background to this text is a conversation between Jesus and a rich young man who desired to become one of His followers. The young man was under the impression that works could get him into heaven. He was already living rather piously, but there was one thing that came between him and God: his personal wealth.

The point of the story is not that all followers of Jesus should sell everything they own in order to be faithful in their discipleship. Instead, the point is that there should be nothing in our lives that comes before our relationship with Christ. If the Lord were to ask us to walk away from something, and we chose not to, then that item is an idol and no different than the great wealth that the rich young ruler was unwilling to walk away from.

Jesus’ command in Matthew 19:21 was given to a specific individual concerning a specific circumstance, it is not a universal command to be obeyed at all times by all people. Jesus does not give this command to other wealthy individuals, and there is no reason to suspect that He ever intended the selling of everything we own to be normative.

What should be considered normative, however, is the idea that nothing should come between us and God. Examples of people being called away from the lives and livelihoods they had known are found multiple times in the Scriptures. For example: Abraham left Ur, David left the flocks, Levi left the lucrative tax-collecting business, and several disciples left the fishing industry. Anything that comes between a person and God is an idol, and idolatry is something always to be avoided.

I know this is a little short this week, but things have been busy : (

Persecution of Christians

My family and I watched God’s Not Dead II last Saturday, and everyone agreed it was a quality movie. The focus of the movie is the pressure, or persecution, being applied to Christians living their faith in public. Such a premise is timely considering the numerous cases reported in the news of public displays of religion being challenged through the legal system. Still, much of the world sees what the Christian community is complaining about as nothing but whining. For instance, I recently stumbled across this quote, attributed to Jon Stewart:

Yes, the long war on Christianity. I pray that one day we may live in an America where Christians can worship freely! In broad daylight! Openly wearing the symbols of their religion… perhaps around their necks? And maybe — dare I dream it? — maybe one day there can be an openly Christian President. Or, perhaps, 43 of them. Consecutively.*

So, in the eyes of Stewart, Christians are simply imagining things. But, it is not just Jon Stewart who feels this way. Many people believe that the Christian community is just crying over little issues and, essentially, making mountains out of mole hills. Even worse, is the fact that there are many Christians who feel this way.

My question, however, is: How long are we to wait before acknowledging the changing tides? Sure, what we are presently seeing is more along the lines of “pressure” than “persecution.” But, after a while, this simply turns into a game of semantics. Belittling the idea of persecution now, on an individual and small-scale level, will allow the ease of transition into more widespread, governmental persecution. We must always remember that Russia was once a staunchly Christian nation that underwent a radical change in a very short period of time.

So, should Christians stand up and speak out when we witness the silencing of the Christian witness in our land of freedom? Absolutely! I cannot help but be reminded of “First they came…” the famous poem from Martin Niemöller:

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.**

In much the same way, I wonder how long before the church can easily change the words “Socialists,” “Trade Unionists,” and “Jews,” for things like “Christian business owner,” “Christian politician,” and “Christian educator”?

* http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/1719-yes-the-long-war-on-christianity-i-pray-that-one

** https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007392