Tag Archives: faith

Thoughts on Finding God in the Waves

I rarely listen to music in the car these days. Instead, I take the opportunity to redeem the time and listen to podcasts, lectures, or books that interest me. One such book I recently listened to was Finding God in the Waves: How I Lost My Faith and Found It Again Through Science, by Mike McHargue – a.k.a. “Science Mike.”

I first heard of this book while listening to one of my favorite podcasts, Justin Brierly’s Unbelievable? I was intrigued by what the author would have to say about his journey from belief to atheism and back to faith. However, it did not take long to realize that this book was definitely not what I was expecting. McHargue is a very engaging story teller and the book is a very transparent account of his struggles with belief, doubt, and unbelief. I am also thankful that he is charitable to the evangelicals he has crossed paths with through the years.

I have spent the last 24 hours turning over in my mind what to say about this book, and I must say that I have two sets of thoughts.

On the negative side:

  1. The author is clearly a smart man who has spent a lot of time reading and studying. What gets annoying is that he comes across at times with something of a superiority complex – a kind of, “I know all of this stuff and you rubes don’t” kind of vibe. Now, he never uses that kind of language, it is strictly my read on his language at times in the book.
  2. I am curious impact his own deconversion and reconversion to his new brand of faith has had on that of his family. Families tend to follow the dad when he is in the picture. From the book, it sounds like his family worships with him at the progressive church he attends, but I wonder if his family also abandoned their evangelical faith and ultimately followed the same path as him.
  3. It didn’t take long to realize there was something fishy going on with the way Mike viewed the world and his retooled belief system. And, sure enough, it eventually became apparent that He is some sort of materialist (my words, not his). I am not alone in thinking this, an article in the Christian Research Journal zeroes in on this point quite succinctly. At the end of the day, a purely materialistic worldview is not compatible with Christianity.
  4. The book takes a strange turn when Mike has his spiritual moment at the beach. Strangely, his materialism seems to be put aside (yet never disavowed) without explanation. In one place in the book he makes sure to let the reader know he corrected Rob Bell at a conference when he was telling the crowd that science cannot explain the “why” of things. To this, Mike objected and made the case that science can very well explain the “why.” Yet, toward the end of the book he plays some sort of semantic shell game and tells of how science can’t explain everything. Now, it is possible I did not hear something correctly, but I do remember this standing out and leaving me wondering why he was doing the very thing he had earlier claimed to correct others for doing.
  5. The book mentions Christian apologists in a blanket fashion, but he never names any or speaks of any real engagement with their work. On the flip side, however, he drops the names of New Atheist and Progressive Christian writers.

On to the positives:

  1. The book is a very transparent telling of the author’s struggles. His story gives readers (especially clergy and counselors) a wonderful glimpse into the inner workings of someone struggling with doubt. Mike is not the only one who has, or will, experience such struggles. As such, it is worth having an awareness of what some of those struggles might be.
  2. As noted earlier, the book is charitable to the numerous Christians he encountered through the years. Whether conservative evangelical or mainline, he treats all sides with dignity. This was refreshing.

There is more I could write on this book, but for the sake of everyone involved, I will stop here.

Putting Our Eggs in the Wrong Baskets

I write this post simply to state that a lot of us, as Christians, misguidedly place all of our eggs into the wrong basket. And, if someone has all of their eggs in a basket that fails, then the result is often times a very damaged, or even abandoned, faith.

For instance, a person can place all of their eggs into a particular view of creation (you can take your choice between Young Earth, Old Earth, Intelligent Design, Theistic Evolution, or something else). If that view comes under attack and the holder of the position does not feel it can be adequately defended, a domino effect can take place in that person’s spiritual life that can lead to the ultimate demise of his or her religious belief.

It is important to note that the Christian faith stands or falls primarily on the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Paul, himself, says as much. Outside of this, there is plenty of room for argument and discussion, but if you are going to put all your theological eggs into one basket, then this would be it. After all, the resurrection has several vital doctrines connected to it.

So, why am I spending these few moments to write this very brief post? The answer is simple. Many people will where themselves out battling over some obscure piece of turf that should have never become as important as they made it out to be. It would be like the United States being defeated as a nation, and surrendering unconditionally, in a battle in Greenland – no offense to the good people of Greenland.

Now, let me wrap this up with a note of clarification: the various doctrines we hold are important (even the ones we disagree on), and there are many things worth fighting for (even Greenland). But, it is my prayer that we don’t get so consumed by items on the margins that we lose sight of the most central component of the faith: the resurrection.

God is not a court jester

Have you ever heard or read someone lamenting that there is simply not enough evidence to suggest that God exists? Or, that if He does exist, then He should make it obvious? I have, and I have always wondered what kind of evidence exactly these folks are looking for.

What evidence would be enough to demonstrate to another person that God exists? For some, the thought is that we should expect to see God write “I am real!” in the clouds. However, I am convinced that even this would not convince most unbelievers. To be quite plain, the evidence for God is all around us in creation. Sure, there are materialistic ways to explain most of what we see, but I do not see how this explains away God. After all, you could stumble into my kitchen on a Saturday morning, find a pot of cheese grits on the stove, explain there existence through various laws of physics, and defiantly claim that no grit-maker exists because everything could be explained materialistically. The problem with this, however, is that I do exist.

So, lets consider the evidence that God could provide us, and how He has fared in providing it:

  • He could write something to us. Check – Bible.
  • He could speak to us in some way. Check – prophets.
  • He could physically come into the world and dwell with us. Check – Jesus.
  • He could make the created order look like something designed by an intelligent creator. Check – the created order certainly appears to have design.
  • He could make us naturally inclined to believe in Him. Check – we do have natural biases towards seeing design in nature and desiring the supernatural.

This is a small list off the top of my head illustrating that God has given us plenty of evidence for His existence. But, as you may be aware, those who do not believe will typically scoff at the items on this list. So, the real issue is not that God has failed to give us evidence. Indeed, it appears that the real issue is that God is not capable of being manipulated. People want God to be a court jester and not the sovereign ruler and creator of all that is.

A court jester can be told what to do, when to do it, and how it should be done. If God were a court jester, we could demand services from Him and expect them to be done in the way we want at the time we want. And, at the end of the day, it seems that this is what skeptical people are after. But, if God were a court jester, he would not be worth worshiping. The one true God, however, is worthy of our worship and He is not a court jester but is indeed the King of kings and Lord of lords.

The Corrosive Effect of Liberal Clergy

If you were to take a look at the church as a whole, you would probably notice that members of the clergy vary widely in their view of Scripture. There are many who have a very high view of the authority and veracity of the Old and New Testaments, and there are probably just as many that have a very low view of the same. Now, when I speak of a “high view,” I am speaking of a view that maintains that the Scripture is, in fact, the inspired, inerrant, Word of God. So, for instance, a person with a high view of Scripture will see the miracles recorded in the Bible as actual historical events. The high view also leads to the recognition of the Bible as the accurate and authoritative teachings of God in regards to morals and ethics.

The “low view” of Scripture, on the other hand, sees the Bible very differently. In this camp you can find an anti-supernatural bias that guides its members in their approach to Scripture. So, a person with a low view of Scripture will question the miracle claims of found in the Bible, and will cast doubts on the inspiration and inerrancy of God’s Word. As an example, an instructor I had for a class in the Course of Study doubted that Matthew wrote the Gospel bearing his name as well as the account of Jesus feeding the multitude. For him, Jesus simply inspired others to share their lunches. (For another example, click here, or read this post from Albert Mohler).

Now, I should also point out that there are people all along the way between the high and low views. So, now that I have mentioned it, I will move along.

The low view of Scripture (as I have described it) is found almost exclusively among liberal clergy. Please recognize that I am not referring to politics when I speak of liberal and conservative in the context of theology. You can find liberal clergy who are diehard Republicans, and conservative clergy who are died-in-the-wool Democrats.

So, why am I writing this post? Simple. Liberal clergy have an incredibly corrosive effect on the church. In fact, you could say that liberal clergy are the atheists’ “man on the inside.” That liberal clergy have a powerfully corrosive effect on Christianity can be seen in the watered down morality espoused at many churches. Even atheists such as Daniel Dennet and Linda LaScola recognize how effective liberal clergy are in destroying people’s faith (click here to see the article). I see such clergy as a fulfillment of Paul’s warning in 2 Cor. 11:14 that, “And no wonder, for Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light” (NIV). But, to make matters worse, there are even atheist pastors. It is a sad, but true, thing to say that there are apparently numerous wolves in sheep’s clothing standing in pulpits. Evidence of this is abundant with the advent of The Clergy Project, and a book authored by Dennet and LaScola.

The reason I bring all this up is that we should take a good, hard look at what we are being taught from the pulpit. If we are being told only those things that we want to hear, it may be that we are worshiping something of our own creation. Christianity was never meant to be easy. Sure, it is easy to slap a label on one’s self and say, “I’m a Christian.” But, it is a whole other matter to actually BE a Christian. Ordination committees should be wise in carrying out their sacred duties, as should pastor-parish committees. And, if these governing bodies fail in their tasks, then Christ followers should prayerfully consider leaving those congregations that are being led by the spiritually blind.

So, at the end of the day, let me say that, if you want to see your faith grow, then you would be better off under the teaching of someone who actually believes what they are preaching.

Is it true that you don’t need to go to church if you believe?

You may have heard someone say that believing in Jesus is “enough,” and that there is no need to attend church. You may, in fact, feel that way yourself. But, the question, however, is whether or not the statement is true. And, it is my contention that the statement is false. So, let me explain.

Now, to be fair, I must confess that belief (the concept of putting trust into something or someone) in Jesus is sufficient for salvation. But, there is more to the equation than most people probably think. You see, many people approach faith in Jesus Christ like an End User License Agreement (EULA). They know they need to check the box in order to enjoy the product, so they do so without reading or understanding anything of what they have signed. Similarly, there are numerous people who have heard that faith in Jesus the Son is necessary for eternal life with God the Father, and check the faith box without having any idea what they have just signed up for.

So, the question now becomes: Does this person have “faith” or “belief in” Jesus Christ for salvation? I believe they do not. Jesus tells His followers to count the cost of being a disciple (Luke 14:28-35). But there can be no counting of the cost for someone who simply checks the block. So, whatever kind of faith a block checker has, it does not seem to line up with what Jesus expects of His followers.  I should also lay my cards on the table and confess that I am on the Arminian side of the house theologically.  So, I do believe that a person can lose their salvation.  And, something tells me a block checker would lose faith, if they ever truly had it, far faster than someone who counted the cost.

But, let’s approach the question of whether or not a Christian should attend church or not more directly. To begin, throughout Scripture faith is seen as both private, something that defines you when alone, as well as public, something that is done in a group setting. In the Old Testament, we see true faith being expressed in the central place of worship, whether the tabernacle or the temple. We see idolatry being practiced away from these central places of worship. In the intertestamental the the development of synagogues takes place worship takes place there. Once we reach the New Testament, we see the Christian community meeting in groups for instruction, fellowship, the breaking of bread, and prayer (Acts 2:42).

Continuing on, Hebrews 10:24-25 states, “And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds, not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching” (NIV). The point here is that the church, the faithful body of believers, is to continue meeting together, and not be like those that have given up the practice of gathering with fellow Christians. Part of the benefit of such meetings is the mutual support and encouragement found within the faith community.

So, it is clear from Scripture that we should meet together in community with fellow believers. Now, let me wrap this post up with a few closing points. Attending church provides the following, at the very least:

Conservation of Orthodoxy: Trained clergy and the accountability provided by a congregation of fellow believers helps to protect right belief. Though there are many examples of churches, and even denominations, that have gone astray, these are generally recognized as heterodox by the larger church.

Support for Missions: Groups of believers can typically do more to support local and global missions than individuals. Thus, being part of a church body can help us fulfill the Great Commission (Matt. 28:19-20).

Support and Encouragement: Church provides a place for believers to find mutual support and encouragement to help navigate the struggles and hardships of life, as well as a place to share joys and blessings with others.

Sacraments: The sacraments are done in community, and there seems to be no way around this. Despite what may have been seen on television, or in a movie, there is no indication in Scripture that a person can baptize his or herself. Nor can you serve the Lord’s Supper to yourself. It just doesn’t work that way.

I could continue to go on, but I will stop this post here – I am not writing a paper, after all. One page on the Word Processor is enough for a blog post.