Tag Archives: United Methodist Church

It’s time for the UMC to Split

It is time… In fact, it is past time for the United Methodist Church to go through an amicable separation. For far too long we have been playing the game of trying to stay together and pretend everything is well. The reality, however, is that everything is not well.

I believe it was at the 2008 or 2012 General Conference that mention of an amicable separation was mentioned, only to have the typical knee-jerk spasmodic reaction that we typically have when someone mentions the idea. People were up in arms, calling for unity, and speaking about how foreign such an idea was. Garbage. The idea was not foreign. Indeed, many of us have thought about it for a number of years. The reaction of  many of the representatives at General Conference reminds me of the way the media reacted to the 2016 election: we never saw that coming. No kidding. To see something like that coming you have to get out of whatever ivory tower you are in and visit the commoners that populate the churches on Sunday morning. There you will find a wide range of folks. There will be everything from people who abhor the idea of a split to those who have their metaphorical “bug out” bags packed and ready to go.

If we would have taken seriously the words spoken at that General Conference years ago, a lot of heartache and ill will within the denomination could have been avoided. The new denominational structures would already be up and running by now and we could all focus on ministry instead of figuring out how we can muck up things for a while longer.

If you have been following all the chatter around the special General COnference this year, then you have probably formed an opinion about which plans you like and don’t like for moving forward. For me, the Traditional Plan is the way to go. Now, I understand a split will undoubtedly follow this move, but it will be good in the end. The Bishops seem to be obsessed with the One Church Plan, but unless following the PCUSA down the same path they took is your idea of good plan, then I would avoid this like the plague. The other plan they have been tossing out there, where we essentially have different jurisdictions of the church based on theology overlapping geographically, is the ecclesiastical version of a house of mirrors – you never know what you are looking at.

I think I’ll leave it at that for now.

Can the United Methodist Church Survive?

The United Methodist Church is rapidly approaching a fork in the road that has enormous consequences regardless of which direction it chooses.  For years the church has been embroiled in a controversy of its own making.  On the one side are traditionalists who want to turn the church back toward its theology of origin.  On the other side are those who wish to set aside traditional ways of thinking for more progressive.  And, in the middle are those with their heads in the sand hoping the denomination can continue pretending that all is well.

Those in the middle are in a hopeless situation to say the least.  That leaves the traditionalists and progressives to determine the future of the church.  Can the two sides be reconciled? Let me answer this with a clear and emphatic “no!”  When one side or the other speaks of reconciliation in matters of theology, what they are actually saying is, “Come over to my side and we will be reconciled.”

I, myself, am counted amongst the traditionalists.  And, I do think the church needs to split.  Staying together like we are is helping no one.

Now, let me speak briefly to something I typed in the opening paragraph.  I wrote that this controversy is of our own making and I mean every word of that.  Refusing to stand firmly on beliefs only leads to the degredation of those beliefs.  The old syaing goes, “If you let the nose of the camel intio the tent, you let the whole camel in.”   In the same way, when the United Methodist Church refuses to enforce its own Book of Discipline, it cannot help but to collapse under the weight of all that soon follows.  This is where we are now: a camel is in the tent.  It is time to either move on, or learn to live with a camel.